My Cube, 1st Floor, Anuj Chambers, 24 Park Street, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. 700016 Kolkata IN
QRETTO
My Cube, 1st Floor, Anuj Chambers, 24 Park Street, Kolkata, West Bengal, India. Kolkata, IN
+918910438319 //cdn1.storehippo.com/s/604094409fa5ed89d0a3f790/61e9246390141bde332731a2/20220120_134832_0000-480x480.png" soumi@qretto.com
‎ 978-0349117546 61bb33734304022c6a67075a Shantaram //cdn1.storehippo.com/s/604094409fa5ed89d0a3f790/61bb3308c36a952a72f1a9a6/shantaram.jpg

About the book -  Its a ...‘A literary masterpiece . . . at once erudite and intimate, reflective and funny . . . it has the grit and pace of a thriller’ in the words of Daily Telegraph. A novel of high adventure, great storytelling and moral purpose, based on an extraordinary true story of eight years in the Bombay underworld.

In this book the author pens down about............‘In the early 80s, Gregory David Roberts, an armed robber and heroin addict, escaped from an Australian prison to India, where he lived in a Bombay slum. There, he established a free health clinic and also joined the mafia, working as a money launderer, forger and street soldier. He found time to learn Hindi and Marathi, fall in love, and spend time being worked over in an Indian jail. Then, in case anyone thought he was slacking, he acted in Bollywood and fought with the Mujahedeen in Afghanistan . . . Amazingly, Roberts wrote Shantaram three times after prison guards trashed the first two versions. It’s a profound tribute to his willpower . . . At once a high-kicking, eye-gouging adventure, a love saga and a savage yet tenderly lyrical fugitive vision.’ 

About the author - Gregory David Roberts (born Gregory John Peter Smith; 21 June 1952[1]) is an Australian author best known for his novel Shantaram. He is a former heroin addict and convicted bank robber who escaped from Pentridge Prison in 1980 and fled to India, where he lived for ten years. Roberts reportedly became addicted to heroin after his marriage ended and he lost custody of his young daughter. To finance his drug habit, Roberts turned to crime, becoming known as the "Building Society Bandit"[2] and the "Gentleman Bandit", because he only robbed institutions with adequate insurance. He wore a three-piece suit, and he always said "please" and "thank you" to the people he robbed.[3] At the time, Roberts believed that his manner lessened the brutality of his acts but, later in his life, he admitted that people only gave him money because he had made them afraid.[4] He escaped from Pentridge Prison in 1980.[1][5] In 1990, Roberts was captured in Frankfurt, trying to smuggle himself into the country. He was extradited to Australia and served a further six years in prison, two of which were spent in solitary confinement. According to Roberts, he escaped prison again during that time, but thought better of it and smuggled himself back into jail. His intention was to serve the rest of his sentence to give himself the chance to be reunited with his family. During his second stay in Australian prison, he began writing Shantaram. The manuscript was destroyed twice by prison staff while Roberts was writing it.[6]

SKU-PZR8JXCVZGXQ
in stock INR 599
Retail Maharaj
1 1

Shantaram

₹599


Sold By: Retail Maharaj
Features
  • ISBN - 978-0349117546
  • Pages - 944
  • Binding - Paperback
  • Imprint- Abacus
  • Published on - March 2005
VARIANT SELLER PRICE QUANTITY

Description of product

About the book -  Its a ...‘A literary masterpiece . . . at once erudite and intimate, reflective and funny . . . it has the grit and pace of a thriller’ in the words of Daily Telegraph. A novel of high adventure, great storytelling and moral purpose, based on an extraordinary true story of eight years in the Bombay underworld.

In this book the author pens down about............‘In the early 80s, Gregory David Roberts, an armed robber and heroin addict, escaped from an Australian prison to India, where he lived in a Bombay slum. There, he established a free health clinic and also joined the mafia, working as a money launderer, forger and street soldier. He found time to learn Hindi and Marathi, fall in love, and spend time being worked over in an Indian jail. Then, in case anyone thought he was slacking, he acted in Bollywood and fought with the Mujahedeen in Afghanistan . . . Amazingly, Roberts wrote Shantaram three times after prison guards trashed the first two versions. It’s a profound tribute to his willpower . . . At once a high-kicking, eye-gouging adventure, a love saga and a savage yet tenderly lyrical fugitive vision.’ 

About the author - Gregory David Roberts (born Gregory John Peter Smith; 21 June 1952[1]) is an Australian author best known for his novel Shantaram. He is a former heroin addict and convicted bank robber who escaped from Pentridge Prison in 1980 and fled to India, where he lived for ten years. Roberts reportedly became addicted to heroin after his marriage ended and he lost custody of his young daughter. To finance his drug habit, Roberts turned to crime, becoming known as the "Building Society Bandit"[2] and the "Gentleman Bandit", because he only robbed institutions with adequate insurance. He wore a three-piece suit, and he always said "please" and "thank you" to the people he robbed.[3] At the time, Roberts believed that his manner lessened the brutality of his acts but, later in his life, he admitted that people only gave him money because he had made them afraid.[4] He escaped from Pentridge Prison in 1980.[1][5] In 1990, Roberts was captured in Frankfurt, trying to smuggle himself into the country. He was extradited to Australia and served a further six years in prison, two of which were spent in solitary confinement. According to Roberts, he escaped prison again during that time, but thought better of it and smuggled himself back into jail. His intention was to serve the rest of his sentence to give himself the chance to be reunited with his family. During his second stay in Australian prison, he began writing Shantaram. The manuscript was destroyed twice by prison staff while Roberts was writing it.[6]

User reviews

  0/5